Vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in mice.

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Neoplasia. 2003
Jan-Feb;5(1):32-40.
Vitamin D binding
protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) inhibits angiogenesis and
tumor growth in mice.
Kisker
O
, Onizuka
S
, Becker
CM
, Fannon
M
, Flynn
E
, D'Amato
R
, Zetter
B
, Folkman
J
, Ray
R
, Swamy
N
, Pirie-Shepherd
S
.
Division of Surgical Research, Children's
Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract
We have isolated a selectively
deglycosylated form of vitamin D binding protein (DBP-maf) generated
from systemically available DBP by a human pancreatic cancer cell line.
DBP-maf is antiproliferative for endothelial cells and antiangiogenic in
the chorioallantoic membrane assay. DBP-maf administered daily was able
to potently inhibit the growth of human pancreatic cancer in immune
compromised mice (T/C=0.09). At higher doses, DBP-maf caused tumor
regression. Histological examination revealed that treated tumors had a
higher number of infiltrating macrophages as well as reduced microvessel
density, and increased levels of apoptosis relative to untreated
tumors. Taken together, these data suggest that DBP-maf is an
antiangiogenic molecule that can act directly on endothelium as well as
stimulate macrophages to attack both the endothelial and tumor cell
compartment of a growing malignancy.